French Canadians, Furs, and Indigenous Women in the Making of the Pacific Northwest

French Canadians, Furs, and Indigenous Women in the Making of the Pacific Northwest

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Jean Barman rewrites the history of the Pacific Northwest from the perspective of the French Canadians involved in the fur economy, the Indigenous women whose presence in their lives encouraged them to stay, and their descendants. For half a century, French Canadians were the regiona€™s largest group of newcomers, facilitating early overland crossings, driving the fur economy, initiating non-wholly-Indigenous agricultural settlement, and easing relations with Indigenous peoples. When the region was divided in 1846, they also ensured that the northern half would go to Britain, ultimately giving Canada its Pacific shoreline.New York: Columbia University Press, 1990. Armitage, Susan. ... In Contact Zones: Aboriginal and Settler Women in Canadaa#39;s Colonial Past, edited by Myra Rutherdale and Katie Pickles, 205-27. Vancouver: UBC Press, 2005. a€“. a€œ Indigenousanbsp;...


Title:French Canadians, Furs, and Indigenous Women in the Making of the Pacific Northwest
Author: Jean Barman
Publisher:UBC Press - 2015-02-25
ISBN-13:

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